Coda EDC Flutes Forum

Author Topic: A Consort of CODAs  (Read 472 times)

Iggy

A Consort of CODAs
« on: March 06, 2019, 09:24:51 pm »
Most instruments come in a group of different sizes, each good for a different part in an ensemble and for different purposes. My suggestion is to have the CODA be like this as well. We already have what is basically the "soprano" of the group, and although it's sound and range is nice, more options would open up numerous possibilities. I know there was talk before of maybe manufacturing an "alto" in G, but I would like to see a "tenor" or even a "bass" as well. Granted, the last two might be a bit on the big side to no longer be an EDC flute, but I'd think the option for low tones would be appreciated.

ubizmo

Re: A Consort of CODAs
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2019, 10:51:05 pm »
Most instruments come in a group of different sizes, each good for a different part in an ensemble and for different purposes. My suggestion is to have the CODA be like this as well. We already have what is basically the "soprano" of the group, and although it's sound and range is nice, more options would open up numerous possibilities. I know there was talk before of maybe manufacturing an "alto" in G, but I would like to see a "tenor" or even a "bass" as well. Granted, the last two might be a bit on the big side to no longer be an EDC flute, but I'd think the option for low tones would be appreciated.

The big question is whether the bisected tone holes could be covered by normal fingers on a larger Coda, or would there have to be keys and pads?

Of course, keys and pads would change the basic character of the instrument, but it's fun to speculate. One of the main advantages of the Boehm concert flute over traditional flutes is that the use of keys and pads makes it possible to avoid most, or all, cross-fingerings. Cross-fingerings are not just awkward but also affect tone quality on a tubular open-end kind of flute. On an ocarina or vessel flute, I don't think cross-fingerings have any effect on tone quality but they are still more awkward than what's possible on keyed instruments.

I think you'd also need bisected tone holes, with keys and pads, for the sharps and flats. I'm picturing a tenor Coda, an octave lower than our Coda, with pads for the basic C scale, like the basic keys of a saxophone. Plus it would have keys for C#, D#, G#, and A#. You might be able to get away with no key for F#. It would have to be big, not only for the low pitch but also to support all that keywork.

tnelsond

Re: A Consort of CODAs
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2019, 09:20:11 pm »
The big question is whether the bisected tone holes could be covered by normal fingers on a larger Coda, or would there have to be keys and pads?

I think that because the tenor or bass coda would be bigger, and the placement of the holes doesn't matter like it does on a regular flute, you could position the holes where your fingers can reach them. And then elongate the holes so that you cover them with the last two pads of your fingers instead of just the end pad. Bam, tenor coda with no keys or pads.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2019, 09:27:25 pm by tnelsond »

Windjammer

Re: A Consort of CODAs
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2019, 11:51:23 pm »
I would love to have a coda one octave lower.  ;)

tnelsond

Re: A Consort of CODAs
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2019, 03:30:20 pm »
I would love to have a coda one octave lower.  ;)

Since it would be an octave lower, that would mean that it's twice as large on every dimension I believe. So it'd be about the size of a Bible, lol.

Windjammer

Re: A Consort of CODAs
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2019, 07:13:29 pm »
I don’t think it would need to be quite that big but the biggest problem would be the hole size.  :(

tnelsond

Re: A Consort of CODAs
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2019, 07:32:57 pm »
I don’t think it would need to be quite that big but the biggest problem would be the hole size.  :(

Where is the law written that says you can only block a hole with the tip of your finger? I have some Indian bamboo flutes that you have to use the middle of the fingers to play. You cover the holes with the 2nd pad of your fingers which is a joint up from the tip.

 You might be able to have a hole span from the tip of your finger to the middle. I think that's possible.

Windjammer

Re: A Consort of CODAs
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2019, 09:24:02 am »
That could possibly work. I have never played a flute that is flat and not round like that. They might have to change the shape to make it work like that. The lower flute might lose its EDC status but it would still be nice to have. Even if it was just a alto.  ;) Sense were just throwing ideas out there. :)

tnelsond

Re: A Consort of CODAs
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2019, 09:36:27 am »

This is what I was referring to. You can cover holes with parts of your finger besides just the tip.

Windjammer

Re: A Consort of CODAs
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2019, 11:43:41 am »
Do you think if it wasn’t round you could still seal the holes well ?  Like the shape of Coda. Or would Coda need to be rounded for that type of fingering to work well ?

tnelsond

Re: A Consort of CODAs
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2019, 01:39:36 pm »
A little rounder might be better. Trying it right now, the ergonomic divets get in the way, but I can cover two holes with one finger with some effort.