Coda EDC Flute Forum

Author Topic: Hint for learning to cover tone holes  (Read 219 times)

hoodsmom

Hint for learning to cover tone holes
« on: December 23, 2018, 12:54:29 pm »
Maybe this will help someone learn to cover the tone holes.

I could not figure out why my notes were slightly off (I used a tuner to check) - especially in the upper register.

I tried futzing with angling my finger pads in various ways and finally "got it" by playing the high C (in each register) and walking down the scale. I think starting by covering one tone hole on the top of the instrument and gradually increasing the number of covered tone holes makes it easier to tell what you're doing wrong. When you start at the bottom of the scale, you've got many tone holes covered and it's hard to tell which hole might be improperly covered.

Explorer

Re: Hint for learning to cover tone holes
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2018, 01:10:48 am »
This is an *excellent* method for really learning fingertip/fingerpad positioning. It provides immediate feedback on where things might be going wrong. Thanks for sharing it!

Stefan

Re: Hint for learning to cover tone holes
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2018, 08:41:58 am »
That's so simple and so clever! haha I received my CODA yesterday, and indeed the finger position is different from other ocarinas, I had to test with positions/angles until I wasn't playing sharp. I think I got it, at the end of my practice I was consistent, but if I have more problems with that today I'll definitely try your method!

hoodsmom

Re: Hint for learning to cover tone holes
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2018, 04:41:45 pm »
If you read Karl's patent application documents, you learn that the centermost tone hole of each bifurcated hole is the hole for the upper chamber and the outermost the hole for the lower chamber (try completely covering vs. not quite covering the centermost tone hole of the "high" B on the lower chamber and you'll see what I mean). My fingering errors usually result when I try to play upper chamber notes without completely covering one of the centermost holes. I'm a lot better now that I anticipate the need to really cover certain centermost holes when playing upper chamber notes - especially after some sort of major fingering switch.

One thing I really like about the CODA is that the uppermost and lowermost notes in both chambers are not as sensitive to breath pressure as they are in my MO's. I've spent ages futzing with breath pressure and embrochure when I play my MO's - as a CODA newbie, it's great not to have to worry so much about that.

Harp Player

Re: Hint for learning to cover tone holes
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2018, 03:16:25 am »
I struggled for months with the low C on my MO, and that is the biggest gripe I had with it. Every note on the CODA is stable and strong, that alone makes it worth the extra money.

Jerobobo

Re: Hint for learning to cover tone holes
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2019, 08:32:26 am »
I too had difficulty with consistency on the upper chamber notes until, as hoodsmom noted, I realised the upper chamber is served by the innermost holes. By consciously playing those holes with my fingertips when in the upper register my brain found everything easier than in my earlier attempts to actually ignore the double holes. And now with practice I have discovered my accuracy for closing both holes simultaneously has improved and I don’t need to think of the separate rows anymore.

Roderick

Re: Hint for learning to cover tone holes
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2019, 07:26:11 pm »
I too had difficulty with consistency on the upper chamber notes until, as hoodsmom noted, I realised the upper chamber is served by the innermost holes. By consciously playing those holes with my fingertips when in the upper register my brain found everything easier than in my earlier attempts to actually ignore the double holes. And now with practice I have discovered my accuracy for closing both holes simultaneously has improved and I don’t need to think of the separate rows anymore.

Practice makes perfect.  ;)
English is not my native tongue, pardon any mistake. ;)